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The Ordeal of the Suspended Driver’s License

Written by on September 25, 2018

It is a beautiful day like any other. You go to your front door and check the mail. Inside your mailbox is a notice from the Secretary of State informing you that your license has been suspended. This could be a total surprise or something you have been dreading for quite some time. Either way, getting your license reinstated can be expensive and time-consuming. How could this have happened?

Reasons a License is Suspended or Revoked

There are several reasons why driving privileges might be revoked. Some of them include:

  • Violating traffic laws too frequently (three times within a 12-month period)
  • 10 or more parking tickets that are unpaid
  • Failure to pay court-ordered child support
  • Five or more tollway violations
  • Driving uninsured
  • Failing an auto emissions test
  • Not showing up to an appointed court date
  • Drunk driving or operating a vehicle under the influence

The Difference in Penalties

Many people are under the impression that having your driver’s license suspended and having it revoked are the same. They are not. When your license is suspended, your driving privileges are taken away temporarily for an assigned time. When your license is revoked, driving privileges are rescinded for an amount of time that is not specific. The true downside of the revocation of a license is that you are unable to re-apply for reinstatement for a minimum of one year.     

There are other forms of driver’s license suspension, as well. A statute summary suspension is a penalty handed down to motorists who drive while under the influence and refuse to allow a police officer to conduct a chemical test for sobriety. The consequence for this offense is steep, consisting of a suspension lasting one to three years. But even if a driver is cooperative and submits to the chemical test, they can still have their license suspended if the level of alcohol in their blood is 0.08% or higher or if drugs are present.

In an effort to minimize teen drunk driving, states enforce a zero-tolerance suspension that is imposed if a motorist is under 21 years of age and refuses an officer’s request for a chemical test.  The penalty of refusal is the suspension of driving privileges lasting six months to two years.

The duration of the suspension, for some, can be minimized if the offender does not have a history of driving violations. A person can be eligible for a probationary license if his or her license has been suspended for three months or less and has no more than three violations in a 12-month period. However, this is only granted to motorists 21 years of age or older who have attended a defensive driving class.

License Suspended? Work with an Experienced Attorney in Indiana to Get it Restored

As you can see from the list above, getting your driver’s license suspended is easy, but getting it reinstated can be hard. Let us help you with the process. At The Bellinger Law Office, we will navigate you through the maze of an administrative hearing and reinstatement processes. We will be by your side if there is a need to request a formal hearing or pay fees for reinstatement. We can save you time and the aggravation of doing it all by yourself.

For an evaluation of your case, click here or call (260) 428-2214 so we can help you get back on the road.

Request a Consultation

Contact The Bellinger Law Office in Fort Wayne, Indiana, to learn how we can provide you with legal representation tailored to your precise needs. We listen to your concerns, learn about your case and act decisively to protect your rights. Call 260-428-2214 to learn how attorney Robert Bellinger can advocate for you. Or complete the intake form below to get started.

A Commitment to Achieving the Best Possible Results

Call us to schedule a consultation

260-428-2214